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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: May 27, 2011 11:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Born This Way?

"With adults, though, I think the music does have to be seriously interesting for us to act like this for years on end..."

Why in hell can't my wife look at it that way?

Another thought that works in the Dead's favor in terms of keeping the fanatacism alive as well as starting new in some folks is the silly amount of music available so easily (and so cheaply). By allowing taping of all their shows the Boys certainly succeeded in cementing their permanence.


This post was modified by SomeDarkHollow on 2011-05-27 18:59:28

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Poster: light into ashes Date: May 27, 2011 12:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Born This Way?

That's true too, that the endless number of live shows available provides us with endless permutations & different versions of the music. If it were just the albums available, folks like bkidwell & myself would have nothing to study! And, really, there'd be very little to talk about.

Of course, Dylan's in the same boat. His followers are also known for going to show after show, because the next one might be 'different' or have that rare gem in there... And of course, fans have been taping his shows since 1961! And bootlegging them ever since the dawn of bootlegs...
So he's a very comparable case, where the best stuff is often unreleased, and people have all these shows available and can dive into rabid discussions over whether a song was done best in '66 or '76 or '96, etc....

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Poster: wisconsindead Date: May 27, 2011 4:07pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Born This Way?

Great post dark hollow. I've wondered how much of our experience listening to the dead is due to a certain type of hardwiring in the brain. Though I think it should be noted that furthur emphasis of any muscles or nerves develop stronger connections. I believe over time we seem to become better at listening to the dead and hearing it for how it is most effectively percieved. I'd like a geneticist or a neuroscientist to take brain scans or DNA tests to search for a commonality in dead heads.

ANy dead-head neuroscientists out there?

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Poster: splue Date: May 27, 2011 6:46pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Born This Way? yeppers

:/ im not 2 good with neroscience, but im burnin my way thru that medical coloring book sumone uploaded 2 texts recently

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: May 27, 2011 4:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Born This Way?

I agree with your assessment of Dylan - over time, his importance cannot be overstated. He was an important influence over the entire period. That said, I would also argue that his contribution was a little more social and literary than musical - although the music is solid and entertaining, there's nothing spectacular or unusual about it. His music is in direct lineage from gospel choirs, field hollers, blues players, and folksingers. (Guthrie) To these ears, Dylan was the first white rapper ! (Not meant to be derogatory - I just think of rap and hip/hop as "street poetry", not music.)

I think SDH and bkidwell really hit the nail on the head. It's the music - you either get it or you don't, and we all get different little pieces of that amazing spectrum.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: May 27, 2011 7:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Born This Way?

Hmm....although I think Dylan's the single most important person in rock music in the last 50 years, I don't see him as really having "social or literary" importance as you put it, as his primary influence was on other musicians. Kind of a combination of songs/lyrics/singing style that reset what was possible for other people to do. The music itself, as you say, didn't really break new ground - that was just the setting for the really important stuff - though the musical styles he chose were often very effective. Though now I think about it, that seems a limiting way to put it - but the magic of a Dylan song isn't in the fancy chords! One reason, I guess, they have been so often covered & reinterpreted in different styles...